What is the forgotten commodity

what is the forgotten commodity

Analyst insight: Rice, the forgotten commodity supporting wheat prices

Originally aired on EMTV's Olsem Wanem program, SPICES: The Forgotten Commodity is a short film on the potential of the spice industry in Papua New Guinea. Although small now, the industry has the potential to earn the country more than K million a year. What it lacks though is any proper government support. Despite this neglect, spices are a perfect example of how. May 22,  · How Gold Became the Forgotten Commodity The kiss of death for traders is flat performance. Dan Caplinger (TMFGalagan) May 22, at AM Author Bio. Dan Caplinger has been a contract writer Author: Dan Caplinger.

Thursday, 9 April As we move through unprecedented times, we often have to look outside the box to find the drivers of markets. Over the past fortnight, wheat prices have been what to see in cordoba spain in one day driven by global macroeconomics. However, as the macroeconomics are what deaner was talking about factored in, markets for products that are substitutable for wheat also become key to market direction.

One such market is rice, looking at the historical relationship between rice and wheat, as a rule of thumb, if rice markets get tighter there is generally support for wheat prices.

On the face of global supply and demand, the rice market does not look overly tight. Looking at the headline global level of stocks-to-use, we have seen continued stock growth, this in theory reduces the impact of the rice market on wheat prices. The most recent forecasts available for wheat markets, do not take into account the impacts that we are seeing in global markets from coronavirus. In particular there are expected to be large implications for movement of labour in Asia.

This is particularly true for India, last week the New York Times reported that Indian rice traders have stopped signing new export contracts due to labour and logistics challenges. Additionally short-term demand, as a result of stockpiling globally, this is expected to offer support to prices.

The move higher in rice futures has followed the general trend in global grain futures, and whilst arguably not a direct driver of wheat prices, it could become one should the rice market tighten significantly. The growth of wheat stocks did pressure prices, as it should, however there were individual peaks in rice markets which coincide with spikes in the wheat price. Going forward it would be prudent to keep an eye on developments in labour and haulage in India, Vietnam and Thailand, as tightness in rice markets could offer isolated periods of support for global wheat markets as food security rises on the political agenda.

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Jun 12,  · Safe Blood: The Forgotten Commodity for Maternal, Newborn Health Blood products are critical, but persistently overlooked in the quest for ending preventable maternal mortality. Jan 17,  · Wheat Is the Forgotten Commodity Is it time to get bullish? By CARLEY GARNER Jan 17, | PM EST. The general public tends to ignore commodity prices unless they are . As the world awakes to the threat posed by palm oil and soy to our forests, it’s in danger of overlooking how paper and packaging drives industrial logging, mis-shapes millions of hectares of forest landscapes and creates monoculture plantations.

Introduction from Emma Clark, maternal, newborn, and child health technical director at Chemonics. The upcoming World Blood Donor Day on June 14 presents an important opportunity to highlight how critical, yet persistently overlooked, blood products are in the global quest to end preventable maternal mortality. Globally, postpartum hemorrhage — or excessive bleeding after birth — is the leading cause of maternal death.

Although the proper use of quality medications can help prevent and manage postpartum hemorrhage, some women will require blood replacement due the amount lost or to underlying conditions. Because of this, access to blood transfusion is considered an essential component of comprehensive emergency obstetric care.

Perhaps no one is more familiar with these issues than Dr. She has spent much of her career working to create blood policies that reduce maternal mortality and reduce the transfer of infections, such as HIV, through unsafe blood transfusions, as well as to improve the distribution of safely screened blood to hard-to-reach areas.

As Dr. Oreh lays out so eloquently below, this is an issue that the global health community must seriously address now. The commodities community, however, has essential expertise around supply chains, procurement, forecasting, clinical guidelines, and markets that can be applied to blood products to advance access to blood in low- and middle-income countries. Through partnerships like the Maternal Health Supplies Caucus, Chemonics and White Ribbon Alliance — along with many other partners — are working together to highlight need, coordinate activities, and channel expertise to understand and address supply and systems issues to ensure access to blood or blood products for women around the world.

Every minute of every day, a woman somewhere in the world dies during pregnancy or childbirth. Globally, the most common cause of maternal death is bleeding. Without access to life-saving maternal health medicines and supplies, including a safe blood supply to replenish lost blood, a woman — already vulnerable from being pregnant or in labor — can bleed out and die.

For more than 10 years, I have worked in blood services in Nigeria, trying to ensure that life-saving blood from volunteer donors is made available to people who need it, many of whom are pregnant women.

My work has often been rewarding: Hundreds of thousands of blood donations made by selfless heroes in my country have saved many lives. In many countries like mine, however, it is still not enough, and so hundreds of women continue to die. Every single day. According to data reported to the World Health Organization, while voluntary blood donations have been on the rise in low- and middle-income countries , donors from the African region are lagging. Of the Women in pregnancy and labor; children suffering from malaria or sickle cell disease; and victims of violence and armed conflict, road accidents, and trauma — these are just a few examples of those who need safe blood to survive.

Aside from numerous myths and misconceptions about blood donations, factors such as anemia, poor nutrition, and malaria prevent many potential blood donors from donating in Nigeria and other sub-Saharan African countries. Coupled with the fact that testing equipment is often unavailable in many low-income settings, access to safe blood is a privilege few can afford. Unfortunately, the total blood donations in the country do not amount to half of that.

As well, the United States withdrew foreign assistance for blood transfusion services to countries like Nigeria, Kenya, Tanzania, and Lesotho, so the situation becomes dire very quickly. The COVID pandemic has only exacerbated the urgency for safe blood and other reproductive and maternal health services, disproportionately affecting vulnerable families and marginalized communities. Medicines and supplies, with an emphasis on blood, was the number-three demand from the global What Women Want survey, which asked 1.

In many low-income countries, blood donations are sourced during massive blood drives and donor recruitment campaigns in communities and higher institutions. COVID—related lockdowns, school closures, and restrictions on public gatherings, however, have severely limited the reliable sources of safe blood. Despite this, blood is still required to save lives. As we celebrate World Blood Donor Day and thank the millions of voluntary and unpaid blood donors around the globe, let us consider for a moment how to optimize their invaluable sacrifice.

First, if there is one thing the COVID pandemic has illustrated, it is that a major health threat has the potential to bring everything to a grinding halt. Investing in robust, efficient, and effective health care services should be made from the ground up.

National and state governments must provide health financing mechanisms that ensure accessibility and availability of services that begin at the primary health care level and ascend to strengthen district, regional, and national hospitals.

For too long, primary health care — which should be the bedrock of our health systems — has been eroding from years of neglect. We are only as strong as our weakest link. Second, there is no alternative to blood. With all the global scientific advances, no product has yet been developed that can provide all the benefits of blood.

National and state governments, therefore, must enable systems that ensure the availability of blood that is safe from the point of collection to transfusion.

These include adequate financing, enabling legislation, a skilled workforce, and innovative systems that will guarantee that national and regional blood services have structures, systems, and processes to decentralize and widen their reach to the grassroots.

When such systems are in place — as they were in Rwanda during an emergency situation — they can quickly be galvanized for a swift response. Finally, blood services must be included in the benefit packages of health insurance providers at state and national levels. In Nigeria and many other countries in sub-Saharan Africa, unfortunately, this is not the case. A system where blood and blood products are paid for out-of-pocket by patients and their families is highly inequitable and leaves too many people unable to get the blood they need.

There must be universal access to safe blood transfusion,because the quality of emergency services is critical to achieving universal health coverage. Photo credit: White Ribbon Alliance.

Posts on the blog represent the views of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of Chemonics. She is also a senior fellow for Global Health with the Aspen Institute and serves as non-executive board secretary to White Ribbon Alliance in…. Although the world has made unprecedented gains in combating tuberculosis TB in the past two decades, access, quality and equity in TB care remain a big challenge.

Early on, lockdown and movement restrictions led to a decline in clinic visits due to fear of contracting COVID Vaccines are one of the most cost-effective public health interventions, saving millions of lives each year. Vaccines historically take years to develop, requiring….

Supporting the implementation and scaling of HIV and TB prevention and treatment programs is key for improving the ability of Nigerian state and local health systems. A sustainable, gender-sensitive, pro-poor social enterprise is helping Bangladesh get closer to achieving universal health coverage. Reliable availability of maternal, neonatal, and child health products in Pakistan is critical.

To improve access to high-quality health products worldwide, the USAID Global Health Supply Chain Program-Procurement and Supply Management project employs cutting-edge technologies and industry best practices to make global health supply chains more efficient and reach more people.

Rwanda made great strides in improving its previously faltering health care system, but family health services still had a long way to go. Acting together to end malaria requires a vast awareness-building campaign. Community leaders in rural Mozambique are fighting misinformation on the ground — one household at a time.

A patient-centric treatment approach is successfully reducing the burden and helping the global health community maintain the progress made to end AIDS by during COVID Chemonics is helping to ensure that health commodities are delivered where they are needed most by using a low-cost, easy-to-use, cloud-based transport management system that increases visibility across the in-country supply chain.

With a new tool at their disposal, health facilities in Malawi are collecting reliable data that ensures lifesaving medicines and supplies reach their final destination.

The Rwandan Ministry of Health is bringing a digital medical records system called OpenMRS to the country, creating a stronger and more efficient healthcare sector.

Counterfeit and substandard medicines put millions of lives at risk in developing countries. In Kenya, Chemonics is equipping local testing labs to root out these killers. By improving the pharmaceutical supply chain in Kenya, life-saving medicine is reaching more than , patients faster than ever.

In , world leaders committed to global targets for tuberculosis treatment, prevention, and funding at the United Nations UN High-Level Meeting. Despite these commitments, progress towards the targets has been less than satisfactory. Regional mapping in West and Central Africa is helping find public-private partnerships opportunities in the global health supply chain. Countries around the world are rapidly assessing and advancing their readiness for COVID vaccines, but success ultimately hinges on whether individuals are willing to accept the vaccine.

In its annual innovation competition, the Society for International Development — Washington Chapter recognizes innovative products and services that are making a positive difference in communities around the world.

This maternal health blog sets the scene for a conversation about the challenges of offering quality care in lower volume, more basic health facilities. Integrating social and health services facilitates coordination and contributes to stronger health systems. Some countries are already integrating these services to protect children against abuse and nourish their environment.

Protecting and promoting breastfeeding is one of the most effective interventions to improve child survival. Here are some ways to support countries and advocates to uphold the International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes as a critical piece of a multisectoral approach. A certified nurse-midwife, Emma Clark shares her thoughts on why midwives matter and why "investments in midwives are investments in our future. Malaria remains a global threat and pregnant women are especially vulnerable.

There are measures we must take to ensure women no longer have to die in childbirth or fear the loss of another pregnancy because they are infected. Contact Us Join Our Team. View all Blog Posts. Adaeze Oreh. Blood products are critical, but persistently overlooked in the quest for ending preventable maternal mortality.

Adaeze Oreh addresses the need for the global community to act now to combat these issues. About Dr. Adaeze Oreh Dr. She is also a senior fellow for Global Health with the Aspen Institute and serves as non-executive board secretary to White Ribbon Alliance in… Read more articles by this author.

Reducing Malaria Mortality in Mozambique. Improving Health and Human Capital in Bangladesh A sustainable, gender-sensitive, pro-poor social enterprise is helping Bangladesh get closer to achieving universal health coverage. Improving Health through Digitized Logistics Information Reliable availability of maternal, neonatal, and child health products in Pakistan is critical. Cutting-edge Technologies in Global Health Supply Chains To improve access to high-quality health products worldwide, the USAID Global Health Supply Chain Program-Procurement and Supply Management project employs cutting-edge technologies and industry best practices to make global health supply chains more efficient and reach more people.

Delivering Family Health Services in Rwanda Rwanda made great strides in improving its previously faltering health care system, but family health services still had a long way to go. View All Projects. Door-to-Door Malaria Awareness in Mozambique Acting together to end malaria requires a vast awareness-building campaign. In TransIT: Enhancing Visibility Across In-Country Supply Chains Chemonics is helping to ensure that health commodities are delivered where they are needed most by using a low-cost, easy-to-use, cloud-based transport management system that increases visibility across the in-country supply chain.

Making Supply Chain Data Visibility a Reality With a new tool at their disposal, health facilities in Malawi are collecting reliable data that ensures lifesaving medicines and supplies reach their final destination. Transforming Healthcare in Rwanda The Rwandan Ministry of Health is bringing a digital medical records system called OpenMRS to the country, creating a stronger and more efficient healthcare sector.

Keeping Medicines Safe Counterfeit and substandard medicines put millions of lives at risk in developing countries. Efficient Supply Chains Deliver Results in Kenya By improving the pharmaceutical supply chain in Kenya, life-saving medicine is reaching more than , patients faster than ever.

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